Back in the Saddle, with a check engine light to boot~!

Hi All! I live in DC and just purchased my third Wrangler ever. One in high school, one in college, and then one yesterday! First car in 14 years. I'm excited. It feels like I never left. In fact, I drove it around the city today and got a check engine light as a friendly reminder of of some of the work I will need to do! I'm in a 2006 Rubicon TJ with a 6" lift. Looks like I'll be needing a new catalytic converter! I'd love to meet folks, explore the area, and get recs on a reliable shop. Thanks!
 

Nacho

President
Member 2022
VA4WD
:jw

Welcome to the group...lots of great folks on here with a wealth of experience and opinions. Look forward to seeing you at an upcoming meeting or event, keep an eye on the meet & greet and trail rides sections of the forum.
 
It seems Jeeps never really fully make their way out of one's system!

At 16 years old it's a good chance the cat needs to be replaced, but personally I'd start with O2 sensors, engine coolant temperature sensor, and cleaning the throttle body. It's all one big math problem, so if sensors are beginning to go bad they'll feed incorrect input (but not bad enough to show as out of range) which is caught at the bottom line (usually P0420). Usually not preferred to just throw parts at a problem, but they're cheap relative to a converter and could probably stand to be replaced regardless.

Being an '06, read up on the 4.0 OPDA as it's a known issue in its own right, but can also lead to issues with timing and related emissions efficiency.

Are there any drivability concerns? If you live in DC I'm guessing there's minimal ability to do the work yourself, I don't know any shops out that way but wherever you take it make sure they have the ability to live frame the readings to properly diagnose it as being the cat compared to a sensor.
 
Hi all! Thanks much.
It seems Jeeps never really fully make their way out of one's system!

At 16 years old it's a good chance the cat needs to be replaced, but personally I'd start with O2 sensors, engine coolant temperature sensor, and cleaning the throttle body. It's all one big math problem, so if sensors are beginning to go bad they'll feed incorrect input (but not bad enough to show as out of range) which is caught at the bottom line (usually P0420). Usually not preferred to just throw parts at a problem, but they're cheap relative to a converter and could probably stand to be replaced regardless.

Being an '06, read up on the 4.0 OPDA as it's a known issue in its own right, but can also lead to issues with timing and related emissions efficiency.

Are there any drivability concerns? If you live in DC I'm guessing there's minimal ability to do the work yourself, I don't know any shops out that way but wherever you take it make sure they have the ability to live frame the readings to properly diagnose it as being the cat compared to a sensor.
Thanks all! And esp Majestek! I've been out of the game, but remember I had to replace the cat on my 93 YJ as well.
The error is P0431 "P0431 code refers to an efficiency shortcoming in the catalytic converter in engine bank number two".
Probably not the best place to discuss this, but I am curious what is the best cat replacement. I knocked down $1,000 of the price. So I will probably just use it to do the whole thing. It's still drivable. So I would go out to a shop in VA somewhere. I actually do have an enclosed garage, but no jack, stands, torque wrenches, or other equipment to do it in. And more importantly time.
 
Sounds like it may indeed be the cat then. The P043x codes are usually legit compared to the catch-all P0420.

It's probably the pre-cats that are downstream of the header. It's part of the y-collector and regardless of which one is bad both have to be replaced unless you cut and weld in a new one, which isn't cost-effective. Torque wrench isn't necessary for this job, but the headers are known to have cracking issues and make crack as your undoing (or more likely breaking) the bolts on the exhaust collars.

Lots of guys on the forum have had good experiences with Bull run 4x4 in Haymarket but it's a fair hike for you. Dranesville Auto is a bit closer and is a very reputable and fair shop. Still a good idea to have a shop that can monitor the live stream data so they can accurately pinpoint the failed converter, you'll have three.

Being new to you I would suggest having them at least check if not replace the opda assembly well it's in the shop.
 
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